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Archive for the category “Tools”

Current Events & Navel Lint

Wondering if life will ever get simple .  .  . It has been months since I touched this blog — which was supposed to be a regularly updated journal of thoughts and a record of things I’ve been doing.

Currently, I’m reading “One Second After,” which is about an EMP strike on these United States.   It is the first in a three-book series by Ph.D. historian William R. Forstchen, with a foreword by Newt Gingrich.  You could call it science fiction, or you could call it a future history, but whatever you call it, it is a dramatization of an all-too-real scenario for how civilization on this continent could end.  Pop a nuke at the edge of space above Kansas City and <*Poof!*> “Goodbye 21st Century, hello 5th Century!”  NOTHING that relies on any kind of battery, integrated circuit, transformer, capacitor, or transistor will be functional unless it’s in a Faraday cage at the time of the event.  The power grids in the U.S.A., Canada, and at least the Northern half of Mexico will all be toast — for years — IF we get the chance to repair them.

Of course, a large Coronal Mass Ejection from our own Sun could do the job — probably more efficiently than any man-made effort.

Do you have a well with a manual pump? (Our state just made drilling a residential water well illegal.  Collecting rainwater has been illegal for several years. Das Stadt owns all the water.)

Can you raise and preserve your own food without the aid of mechanical and electrical devices?

Can you heat your home without the aid of grid power & gas?

Nope, me neither.

You may want to review this timeline of the Dark Ages, just to get a handle on the time span we might be looking at for our children to regain the light of civilization.

If you want more information on the hazards of an EMP attack, check the book’s site: One Second After

So, our state is going through another round of drills for a Cascadia Subduction Zone quake.  That will be a 9.0 – 10+ event that will last five minutes or longer. Emergency managers have finally decided that a 3-day kit will not be enough for people who live in the urban areas of Puget Sound and are now recommending a 14-day kit. For those of us out here in the hinterlands, we’ll most likely be on our own for 30 days or longer. Many small communities have no disaster plan or preparations at all. <<*CRINGE!*>>  Low-lying coastal areas will be toast – of course – due to tsunami inundation.

Now, I’m reviewing what non-power tools we have on hand and putting together a plan for what we might need.

Life will be simple in Heaven, right?

** Updates **

Thought I’d include a couple links to articles I’ve stored in EverNote Web as resources for a TEOTWAKI-class event:

Umm . . . Should I mention that you’ll need to print copies of these articles for offline use?

 

 

 

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Feeding My Tool Addiction

Update: WK Fine Tools has changed their site configuration, so the original link from this post no longer worked.  I’ve found the new address and updated my link.  While I was at it, I added links for Bob Smalser’s article on the 8-siding marking gauge, and I’ve added a link for his index at WK’s tool making pages.

Tools. They are an addiction. Especially once you move beyond the home maintenance tool set. Recently, while planning to build a pair of small sailing dinghies, I got to thinking about making masts, booms and oars. I knew that there’s a way to make a gauge to help you go from square to 8-sided. So . . . Off to my favorite tool making site I went. Turns out there was an article from a gentleman who lives just up the road. Bob Smalser has a real talent with wood, and with making tools, and in knowing how to explain how to do things in plain English so that they are understandable by ADDled dunderheads like me.

Making Woodworking Tools @ WK Fine Tools

Rust Removal « Toolmaking Art

 

Rust Removal « Toolmaking Art.

This is a great article over at the Toolmaking Art blog about using household ingredients to remove rust and protect steel from its return.

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